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U.S. Gas Storage Inventories May Surpass Last Summer’s Record

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) released figures yesterday reporting that 99 Bcf net of natural gas was injected into U.S. storage during the week ending June 22, bringing current gas inventories to 2.443 trillion cubic feet (Tcf). Platts LNG Daily [subscription required] reports that some analysts believe that steady LNG imports and current storage injection trends may...

Oregon County Staff Report Opposes Bradwood Landing

The staff of the Community Development Department of Clatsop County (Ore.) has released its report on NorthernStar’s proposed Bradwood Landing LNG regasification terminal, recommending that the County Commission vote against the project at its July 10 meeting. The report concludes that the developer’s “application fails to comply with county planning policies”...

LNG Imports May Spur Changes to Algonquin Pipeline

Platts LNG Daily reports that the expected increase in LNG imports into the Northeastern U.S. market may lead to upgrades on Spectra Energy’s existing Algonquin pipeline. Spectra may revamp its infrastructure to allow for greater bi-directional flow capacity. [Subscription required]

Gros Cacouna LNG Proposal Receives Approval

Transport Canada announced yesterday that the Canadian government approved the report prepared by the Environmental Assessment Joint Review Panel for TransCanada Corp. and Petro-Canada’s  proposed LNG Terminal at Gros Cacouna, Quebec, thereby authorizing federal agencies to permit the proposal according to the Panel’s mitigation plan. The Globe and Mail reports that the...

Expert: Port Dolphin LNG Terminal No Threat to Onshore Residents

Professor Jerry Havens of the University of Arkansas told the Tampa Bay Tribune Tuesday that the Port Dolphin LNG project proposed for 28 miles offshore Tampa Bay would not pose a threat to Florida’s coastal population, saying “[t]here is not any event that I can imagine that could occur that far offshore that could affect anybody onshore.” Professor Havens said that...

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